Justice in Aging Recognizes Edward Spurgeon with Its First Impact Award

SAN FRANCISCO –Justice in Aging conferred its first Impact Award to Edward Spurgeon, CEO and co-Director of the Borchard Foundation Center on Law and Aging, at a special event here today.

The award recognizes leadership of a foundation, individual or legislator that has had a significant impact on the lives of low-income seniors and who has supported legal advocacy on their behalf.

 

“Ned Spurgeon has a long history of leadership and contributions to NSCLC and to the field of law and aging,” said Board of Directors Chair Robert Johnson. “Because of his commitment to NSCLC’s mission both as a board member and a long-term supporter, it is fitting that Ned should be the organization’s first Impact Award winner.”

As part of the award ceremony at the city’s University Club, NSCLC aired a video tribute to Spurgeon and the Borchard Center that also describes the unique and important role NSCLC plays in alleviating the devastating effects of senior poverty in the United States.

“With Ned’s unwavering support, the Borchard Center has been willing to invest in NSCLC and has helped us in a profound way sustain and grow our mission,” said NSCLC Executive Director Kevin Prindiville. “The Center has also been unique among funders for its willingness to fund impactful litigation on behalf of poor seniors.”

With the Borchard Center’s support, NSCLC and its partners in Darling v Douglas were able to keep adult day care benefits for as many as 35,000 seniors and people with disabilities in California.

In the video, Debbie Toth, CEO of Rehabilitation Services of Northern California says, “Had Disability Rights of California and NSCLC not stepped in and did what they did,” she said, “35,000 would either be in institutions, would be at home isolated with worsening chronic conditions, or dead.”

In addition, much of the legwork in the case was done by Borchard Fellow Evin Isaacson who is also interviewed in the video, “The fellowship…reaffirmed my love of doing strategic, impactful advocacy on behalf of the underprivileged and underserved,” she said. NSCLC has had two Borchard fellows, early career attorneys who want to work in the field of law and aging, and like NSCLC, are committed to addressing injustices that exacerbate the negative effects often faced by the millions of older Americans in poverty.

“The fellows have been a tremendous benefit to our organization and we wouldn’t have had their contributions without Ned’s or the Borchard Center’s support,” Prindiville added. Since 2001, the Borchard Center has also awarded more than two dozen grants to NSCLC funding not only for fellows, but for capacity building, special projects and a number of internships.

Spurgeon has been a practicing lawyer, including a partner at Paul Hastings, Janofsy and Walker in Los Angeles and past dean of both the University of Utah and Georgia Law Schools and Pacific McGeorge School of Law. He received his law degree from Stanford University and a Masters of Law degree from New York University. Spurgeon is a graduate of Princeton University.

NSCLC will confer Impact Awards at future events in Washington, DC, Los Angeles or San Francisco.

The National Senior Citizens Law Center is a non-profit organization whose principal mission is to protect the rights of low-income older adults. Through advocacy, litigation, and the education and counseling of local advocates, we seek to ensure the health and economic security of those with limited income and resources, and access to the courts for all.

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Contact: Vanessa Barrington
510-256-1200 direct
vbarrington(dot)justiceinaging(dot)org

Justice in Aging

About Justice in Aging

Justice in Aging is a national non-profit legal advocacy organization that fights senior poverty through law. Formerly the National Senior Citizens Law Center, since 1972 we’ve worked for access to affordable health care and economic security for older adults with limited resources, focusing especially on populations that have traditionally lacked legal protection such as women, people of color, LGBT individuals, and people with limited English proficiency.