History

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Since 1972, NSCLC has compiled a long list of successful initiatives on a wide variety of issues impacting the lives of low-income older adults in America.

Our advocacy has included important work on Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), language access, long term services and supports and pensions.

Some notable successes include:

  • Prevented the state of California from stopping adult day health care benefits for more than 35,000 low-income older adults and persons with disabilities (2011)
  • Won a reversal of a decision by Kentucky to stop Medicaid benefits totaling $45 million a year for more than 3,300 elderly and people with disabilities in nursing homes (2004)
  • Stopped Mississippi from cutting off an estimated $110 million in Medicaid prescription drug benefits for 48,000 elderly and people with disabilities (2005)
  • Sued the Federal government for widespread failure to protect more than 6 million Medicaid beneficiaries  transferred to Medicare Part D (2006)
  • Ended the Social Security Administration’s policy of denying or suspending benefits for “fleeing to avoid prosecution,” based solely on the existence of an outstanding felony arrest warrant. SSA agreed to repay more than $700 million in benefits that were unlawfully withheld from 80,000 people (2009)
  • Entitled some 3 million blind and visually impaired Social Security beneficiaries — two thirds over age 80 — to now receive notices about their benefits in Braille or on a Microsoft CD (2009)
  • Secured a $7 million settlement for older federal workers laid off by a discriminatory reduction in force (2001)
  • Persuaded California to translate key consumer materials about Medicare Part D into the state’s most popular languages for the 200,000 people who were dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid (2005)
  • Played a key role in drafting and ensuring passage of the Nursing Home Reform Act  which provided strong quality of care standards (1987)

To read more about our first 35 years (1972-2007), click here. To find a particular case, please visit our archives or use our search engine to find it.

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